MIDLANDS VOICES: THE SECRET IS IN NEBRASKA’S TOPSOIL – AND REGENERATIVE PRACTICES

“Just as the soil is itself under threat, so is the Nebraska way of life. It seems there is nothing left for these industrial ag corporations to take but our souls.” — The RegeNEration Proclamation

As a Nebraskan attending college in the northeast, I am often faced with questions like “Where even is Nebraska?” and “What’s notable about Nebraska?” I usually give them the spiel about the College World Series, Warren Buffett, perhaps the Reuben sandwich and, if I’m lucky, I can convince them that I drove a tractor to high school.

Of course, I can’t talk about Nebraska without mentioning the abundance of corn after which our state is nicknamed. But what will we name our football team when climate change-caused drought and wildfires strip our state of viable topsoil and, consequently, the golden corn we grow? Climate change is already affecting Nebraska growers. It’s past time for our farmers to transition to regenerative agriculture practices.

Read more at the Omaha World-Herald

TOPSOIL PROTECTION SHOULD BE STRESSED IN NEXT FARM BILL, U.S. HOUSE AG PANEL TOLD

Farmers and academics at a hearing this week stressed the need for members of the U.S. House Agriculture Committee to support regenerative agriculture farming practices in the upcoming farm bill in order to protect topsoil.

U.S. House Agriculture Committee Chair David Scott said he held the hearing Wednesday to discuss ways policymakers and the Department of Agriculture could help farmers incorporate regenerative agriculture practices. That investment in soil health would curb climate change and prevent a food shortage, the Georgia Democrat said.

Regenerative agriculture occurs in farming and grazing practices that focus on rebuilding organic matter in topsoil, restoring degraded soil biodiversity and improving the water cycle. All of these mitigate climate change by growing plants that capture carbon dioxide and move it into the soil. 

“Conventional agriculture models are degrading American soil,” Jeff Moyer, the chief executive officer of Rodale Institute in Kutztown, Pennsylvania, said. Rodale was a pioneer in organic farming.

Click here to read the article on The Nebraska Examiner!